Besides Xeon processors that are officially mentioned on its website and price list, Intel has tens of ‘off roadmap’ server CPUs only available to select customers that have special requests. Recently journalists from ComputerBase discovered that Intel has Xeon Platinum 8284, the company’s fastest 28-core chip for multi-socket servers. The CPU runs 300 MHz faster than the ‘official’ Xeon Platinum 8280, but costs considerably more.

Intel’s Xeon Platinum 8284 packs 28 cores with Hyper-Threading that run at 3.0-4.0 GHz, feature a 38.5 MB cache, a six-channel memory controller supporting up to 1 TB of DDR4-2933 with ECC, 48 PCIe 3.0 lanes, and other capabilities found in codenamed Cascade Lake CPUs. Since the chip runs at 300 MHz higher base frequency when compared to the Xeon Platinum 8280, it has a 240 W TDP, up from 205 W. Meanwhile, Tcase of the CPU (the maximum allowed temperature on the IHS of the processor) was reduced to 65°C (down from 84°C), so the CPU requires a very sophisticated cooling system that can take away 240 W at the aforementioned temperature.

Being Intel’s fastest 28-core CPU for multi-socket servers, the Xeon Platinum 8284 processor costs $15,460 (recommended customer price for 1k unit order, RCP), whereas the Xeon Platinum 8280 that runs at a 300 MHz lower frequency, costs $10,009 for 1ku.

Intel Second Generation Xeon Scalable Family
(Cascade Lake)
  Cores Base
Freq
Turbo
Freq
L3
Cache
TDP
(W)
Optane Price
(1ku)
Xeon Platinum 8200
8284   28 3.0 4.0 38.50 240 Yes $15460
8280 L 28 2.7 4.0 38.50 205 Yes $17906
8280 M 28 2.7 4.0 38.50 205 Yes $13012
8280   28 2.7 4.0 38.50 205 Yes $10009
8276 L 28 2.2 4.0 38.50 165 Yes $16616
8276 M 28 2.2 4.0 28.50 165 Yes $11722
8276   28 2.2 4.0 38.50 165 Yes $8719
8270   26 2.7 4.0 25.75 205 Yes $7405
8268   24 2.9 3.9 35.75 205 Yes $6302
8260 L 24 2.4 3.9 25.75 165 Yes $12599
8260 M 24 2.4 3.9 25.75 165 Yes $7705
8260   24 2.4 3.9 25.75 165 Yes $4702
8260 Y 24 2.4 3.9 35.75 165 Yes $5320
8256   4 3.8 3.9 16.50 105 Yes $7007
8253 L 16 2.2 3.0 35.75 165 Yes ?
8253 M 16 2.2 3.0 35.75 165 Yes ?
8253   16 2.2 3.0 35.75 165 Yes $3115

The Xeon Platinum 8284 is not mentioned in Intel’s pricelist, and not under Cascade Lake on Intel's ARK database, but it is searchable if you know the exact number. This typically means that the CPU is only available to select customers or even a customer. That said, it is possible that apart from higher clocks, this 'semi-custom' off-roadmap processor may come with features that go beyond that and this might explain the huge price difference when compared to the model 8280.

Related Reading

Source: Intel’s ARK (via ComputerBase)

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  • Irata - Friday, July 19, 2019 - link

    AMD will really have a hard time in the server market where single thread performance matters a lot more than density, power consumption, IO, total cost (including cooling).....
    [/s]
    Reply
  • web2dot0 - Friday, July 19, 2019 - link

    Server market care about single thread?!? You mean most of the time the CPU is idling LOL. Reply
  • Irata - Friday, July 19, 2019 - link

    You missed the [/s] tag. Reply
  • HStewart - Thursday, July 18, 2019 - link

    I wish for once some one here, would keep there comments to topic, I personally refused to comment on AMD unless someone brings up something against Intel or incase of XPS 15 2in1, my gpu like drivers from AMD and such. Reply
  • PeachNCream - Thursday, July 18, 2019 - link

    "...I personally refused to comment on AMD unless someone brings up something against Intel..."

    That's because you have an irrational personal bias and are incapable of widening your thought horizon to the point of being able to overcome that limit.
    Reply
  • HStewart - Thursday, July 18, 2019 - link


    "That's because you have an irrational personal bias and are incapable of widening your thought horizon to the point of being able to overcome that limit."

    There is no irrational bias - in fact it very rational - I prefer Intel because they are the one that actually create the x86 based CPU and was not cloned from it.

    But you notice I mention "Personally", that was one purpose for two reasons
    1. I knew it was going to cause a response from AMD bias fan person and it did
    2. It is true that others have there personal opinions about products and I just wish they keep it to themselves. Just better to agree to disagree

    As for my thought process, you have no idea what experience I have, just to let to know I once work for an operating system and found a bug in IBM 486SLC cpu where chip add it address lines inverted when switching between 286 and 386 protected modes. This was at my first job for almost 7 years and there are few developers on this planet that can even comprehend what I am discussing.

    Let's be honest, do the average customer of computer actually read these comments. In fact that average customer care about it and especially desktop chips - server chips have there own specially.
    But most customers use it for word processing, spreadsheets, internet and emails - but I have 30 years of technical knowledge in these area include low level CPU design and even though I do application program - the low level parts still interest me
    Reply
  • jdw912 - Thursday, July 18, 2019 - link

    Your reply almost sounds like a copypasta where you're just bragging about past experience. Look, it's fine to have preferences and even biases if you can acknowledge them. And it seems like you do acknowledge your own, which is great! But people on the internet also have their personal preferences and it shouldn't blow your mind that people are bringing up AMD on an article like this. Reply
  • Skeptical123 - Thursday, July 18, 2019 - link

    I think regardless of any bias HStewart is right in his criticism that every almost every story is inundated with comments praising AMD and bashing Intel. Regrless of if there comments are right most of the time the form it's done in is not a place for it. And is just off topic, even by internet standards.

    Also while I can certainty understand see what HStewart as "bragging" how else would you suggest he states his justification. For example if he said x is try but you disagree and he replies no I'm a doctor x is true. You can't say no your just bragging. Even if that is the case it is not what matters and is just deflecting from the point. Also I don't like to make thing personal but PeachNCream while I empathize with your passion from your past comments I can't take what you say to seriously.
    Reply
  • Spunjji - Monday, July 22, 2019 - link

    AMD articles were historically "inundated" with comments praising Intel and bashing AMD before Zen came out. This is what tech discussion pages look like - especially when the balance between the two remaining x86 CPU competitors begins to shift. Given that the article is about how much Intel charge for an extra 300Mhz on your 28 core CPU, the imminent appearance of a competitor who tends to provide better value is most certainly an on-topic discussion.

    HStewart is not a logical individual. His claim to authority here makes as much sense as claiming expertise on dental health based on having once been a proctologist. If you find yourself in agreement with him, I'd encourage taking a short break from the internet.
    Reply
  • PeachNCream - Thursday, July 18, 2019 - link

    You're mistakenly projecting your Intel bias outward. Like most people, I don't care what branding is on a CPU. It's amusing that your defense is to attempt to lawyer over the word "personally" and then make claims about your personal experience that do not justify your blind loyalty. Reply

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