Motorola has embraced relatively stock Android since the launch of Moto X. I originally disliked how the Moto X wasn’t really stock, (cue the philosophical discussion about what stock really means), but truth be told the software preload is devoid of what I don’t like about the skinned, operator-adulterated stuff we’d get otherwise. It strikes perhaps the optimal balance between the two, what works is left intact, what tweaks there are seem to be the bare minimum to appease operators and make the experience better for the majority of users.

The Moto G doesn’t deviate from that formula. At launch, the Moto G comes running Android 4.3, the latest possible version supplied by Qualcomm for the platform inside.

 

Motorola has promised an update to Android 4.4 KitKat in January (probably near the end of the month), this aligns with the software roadmaps I’ve caught glimpses of. Remember that Motorola is still effectively an OEM and subject to the software release cadences of its silicon suppliers.

 

The Moto G’s unlocked and operator-free status makes it subject to a bit less than the operator-attached variants of the Moto X I’ve played with, like the AT&T address book and status indicator branding. On the Moto G there’s none of that, just the few tweaks that Motorola has added in, like Device ID, Assist, Migrate, Care, and of course their own camera application.

The delta between the Moto X and G on the software front really comes down to subtraction of features it lacks the hardware for. Specifically the Active Display notifications and interface which used a TI MSP430 and leveraged an AMOLED display, and the always-on voice activation (“OK Google Now”) which used a TI C55x DSP. It’s an easy to understand differentiation point between the two products that I can’t complain about, and although I enjoyed those two features, their absence doesn’t really dilute the software choices that make the Moto G enjoyable.

Moto G also adds an FM radio over Moto X. Inclusion of FM radio is something which remains oddly is absent from most flagship handsets, but a must have on the lower end devices.

 

Just like the Moto X, the bulk of these applications (Camera, FM radio, Boot Services) are updatable over the Play Store. Motorola has effectively decoupled a bunch of their own first party applications from the normal OTA process.

Again I can’t complain about Motorola’s software strategy for the Moto G. I almost hesitate to make the comparison, but Nexus ends up making flagships that are very competitive on cost in the high end segment, the space Moto G is competing in is entirely different. Having Android 4.3 and the promised upgrade to 4.4 within essentially a month is great, but real proof of Motorola’s commitment will be in continued software support beyond that update.

Intro and Hardware Battery Life and Charging
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  • makken - Wednesday, December 18, 2013 - link

    " LG was arguably first to lay claim to it with its Optimus G, G Pro, G2, and now G Flex brands"

    Are we not counting the HTC G1 and G2 now? :(
    Reply
  • blanarahul - Wednesday, December 18, 2013 - link

    Htc is almost dead. I hope Lg buys them. That will give Samsung a run for their money. Reply
  • blanarahul - Wednesday, December 18, 2013 - link

    Great review though. Although buying Moto in my country is just as good as buying a Chinese cellphone. There just aren't service centers around here. Reply
  • Flunk - Wednesday, December 18, 2013 - link

    The do have service centers for other brands? You're a lucky guy, we need to ship our phones back to god knows where for service. My buddy's Samsung phone ended up in Korea for service. Reply
  • blanarahul - Wednesday, December 18, 2013 - link

    I have only used Nokia, Sony and Samsung customer service. But I believe LG has good customer service too. I live in India. Sending to Korea would be a big pain in the ass. Reply
  • spencersears - Friday, October 3, 2014 - link

    Motorola Moto G is a fantastic phone, I'd say only HTC One M8 could match up to it (see http://www.consumertop.com/best-phone-guide/). I don't think you'll need much of a service center though (I've not heard anyone who's had trouble with it), but the choice is yours. Reply
  • puremind - Thursday, December 19, 2013 - link

    HTC has no reason to be dead any time soon. Like Apple, they will increasingly have to Focus on the premium market Segment (though for different reasons). HTC's supplier Rating and lack of Advertising Budget is the only reason they cannot compete well with Samsung, LG and Sony for the lower and mid range, but they will continue to produce superb devices for the top tier consumer segment. Reply
  • Nagorak - Tuesday, December 24, 2013 - link

    They just reported their first loss ever. If they don't turn things around and keep losing money then that is the reason they'll be dead. Companies don't exist to lose money. Reply
  • BallGum - Saturday, December 28, 2013 - link

    Yeah, it's quite a shame this is happening. The HTC One is a brilliant phone but despite everything they're just losing sales to Samsung. It's startling how they slipped from being where Samsung is now, but them consider Nokia... Reply
  • jasonelmore - Thursday, January 2, 2014 - link

    It doesn't make financial sense to buy them unless they have tons of patents which are valuable to LG, Reply

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